Raymond Saner and Lichia Yiu, 2017, Matlin S. & Kickbusch, I. (eds.) “Pathways to Global Health: Case Studies in Global Health Diplomacy (Volume 2)”, Global Health Diplomacy, vol. 5, p.171-210.

The goal of this chapter is to describe and analyse the multi-stakeholder negotiation process which unfolded during the negotiation of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco (FCTC), including the influencing and negotiation behaviour of the different stakeholder groups and how their disputes resulted in the completion of the FCTC, the initiation of negotiations and agreement on a protocol for FCTC Article 15 (the illicit trade in tobacco products), and the unfinished negotiations towards a protocol for FCTC Article 13 (tobacco advertising, promotion, and sponsorship).

Saner, R.;“Organisational Consulting- What a Gestalt Approach Can learn from Off-Off-Broadway Theater”. Gestalt Review, Vol.3(1): 6-21, 1999.

Saner, R., Strehl, F., Yiu, L.; “La Formation Continue Comme un Instrument Pour Le Changement Dans L’Administration Publique“. (English and French). International Institute of Administrative Sciences, 1997.

Saner, R., Yiu, L.;"European and Asian Resistance to the Use of the American Case Method in Management Training: Possible Cultural and Systematic Incongruencies". The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 5 (4): 953-976, 1994.

Raymond Saner organised a panel on « Autonomy and Control : Basic Issues for Public Enterprises in a Competitive Environment » during the annual conference of the International Institute of Administrative Sciences (IIAS) in Vienna in 1992. Delegates presented cases showing how their public enterprises face the competitive pressures in their respective economy be this from private sector or other public sector enterprises. 18 delegates came from 15 countries and two delegates from international organisations (ILO, ARADO) presented their case analyses and subsequently engaged in lively discussions. This article served as a background paper for the subsequent presentations and discussions.

At the core of Biotrade activities is the commercialisation of biodiversity based products and raw materials. This paper will look into one specific aspect of the BioTrade; namely: Natural ingredients from medicinal and aromatic plants for cosmetics and bio- pharmaceuticals. These natural ingredients include essential oils, natural dyes, soapy, creams, butter, and moisturizers in case of cosmetics and extracts and infusions from medicinal plants, natural medicines capsules in case of pharmaceuticals. Constraints and challenges in implementing BioTrade based on Nagoya Protocol for fair benefits sharing will also be discussed in order to meet the basic principles of BioTrade.

People are at the core of organizations whose mission is to deliver aid, through local communities working to generate income, and through national and international leaders working to shape policies and create good governance. At various levels, these interventions aim to lift people and communities out of poverty and ensure a decent standard of living.

WTO Public Forum on BioTrade: CSEND + UNCTAD, September 2015

Biodiversity is essential for the health of the planet's ecosystems and for the livelihood of rural communities in developing countries where 70 per cent of the world’s poor live (CBD Secretariat). These communities are highly dependent on sourcing natural resources to satisfy their basic needs and to generate income and are increasingly threatened by the loss of biodiversity. The roundtable was organized by the Centre for Socio-Eco-Nomic Development (CSEND) and the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). Panelists were from international and intergovernmental organizations, a development bank, academia and from civil society who together discussed the opportunities and challenges for scaling up BioTrade while respecting the sustainable development policy objectives.

Raymond Saner*, Lichia Yiu, Mario Filadoro and Victoria Khusainova in Asia Pacific Journal of Public Administration (APJPA),

Volume 37, Issue 3, 2015, pp 193-206

Water plays a central role in the life of society. However, factors such as population growth, pollution and poor allotment and distribution mechanisms place severe pressures on adequate and equitable water supply. In response, the discussion here contributes to the debate about whether and how water should and can be provided by governments only or with private and social sector participation. Four options are addressed.

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Cooperative enterprises are major players in the global economy. They range from small grassroots initiatives to multibillion dollar businesses and operate in all sectors of the economy. The panel will start with a theoretical presentation of the links between cooperatives and trade. The panel will subsequently turn to practical experiences, and build on cooperative-to-cooperative trade and how it can make value chains shorter, fairer and more efficient and competitive. The seven internationally agreed cooperative principles guide the work of cooperatives around the world. The principle, “Cooperation among Cooperatives”, is the principle most related to the trade, South-South and Global Value Chain perspectives. In the practical part, the case of “China Coop” on promoting cooperative-to-cooperative trade in Asia through different platforms will be presented. The agricultural and consumer cooperative experiences from Italy will be presented to showcase engagement in ethical trade practices using cooperative principles and highlighting the advantages of agricultural and consumer cooperatives working together across the value chain from a perspective of fairness and competitiveness. After the presentations, there will be a round table discussion followed by questions from the floor.

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