Negotiation & Diplomacy

EJIM is a leading journal with European and global perspectives, devoted to advancing international management research, practice and policy. Papers deal with regional, international or comparative issues affecting management scholars and practitioners. EJIM attempts to understand why and how firms manage the movement of people, information, money and products in the context of differing political, economic, social, ecological, competitive and technological environments. It seeks conceptual, theoretical, methodological, empirical, qualitative and review papers advancing the field of international business and management.

Special Issue (2019) NEGOTIATING INTERNATIONAL

STRATEGIC ALLIANCES: EXAMPLES OF SUCCESSES AND FAILURES; Guest Editors, Michael Jeive and Raymond Saner,

European Journal of International Management
Volume 13, No. 5, 2019, pp 581-709.

Raymond Saner and Lichia Yiu, 2017, Matlin S. & Kickbusch, I. (eds.) “Pathways to Global Health: Case Studies in Global Health Diplomacy (Volume 2)”, Global Health Diplomacy, vol. 5, p.171-210.

The goal of this chapter is to describe and analyse the multi-stakeholder negotiation process which unfolded during the negotiation of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco (FCTC), including the influencing and negotiation behaviour of the different stakeholder groups and how their disputes resulted in the completion of the FCTC, the initiation of negotiations and agreement on a protocol for FCTC Article 15 (the illicit trade in tobacco products), and the unfinished negotiations towards a protocol for FCTC Article 13 (tobacco advertising, promotion, and sponsorship).

Studying cross-border regions requires an interdisciplinary approach consisting of among others micro-economics (competitive firm behaviour, local labour markets), spatial economics (rural and urban planning and architecture), policy analysis (regulatory function of government), urban geography (migration patterns), institutional sociology (administrative culture), social psychology (social cohesion) and cultural anthropology (comparative religion and values).

Scholars from different academic disciplines have studied conflict and negotiations over the past centuries going back to ancient times2. This holds not only for Western societies but for the world at large. Whether highly developed with codified norms and written rules or nomadic and based on narrative culture, societies tried to make sense of conflict and attempted to develop conflict resolution methods.

Global Economic Governance from the Perspective of a "Small State" - Economic Diplomacy of Switzerland

Published by the Economic Diplomacy Programme, SAIIA, Occasional Paper, No 124, November 2012.

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