Agenda 2030

 

Deliberation on Sustainable Development Goals

 

icon-20140705Deliberation on the post-2015 sustainable development agenda are taking shape and the negotiations on scope and financing of the SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals) are becoming more concrete and contentious at the same time. Sustainability has been a concern for several decades and has gained greater importance in light of increasing climate warming and continued instabilities of the social and economic sectors at global levels. Two separate UN processes are underway to determine the SDG framework namely the HLPF (High Level Political Forum) and the OWG (Open Working Group) both working on defining and negotiating the world's Sustainable Development Goals. In addition,various stakeholder groups (NGOs, Business, Civil Society, Academic Institutions) and International Organisations have started their own discussions on what issues and priorities should be core features of the coming SDGs.

To be able to agree on a single integrated framework is critical to ensure successful progress towards the definition and implementation of the SDGs. Concrete goals need to be set at national, regional and global levels and concrete financial resources need to be committed for SDG implementation. The issues and themes that will have been identified as being top priorities will set the stage for policy choices concerning sustainable development goals and determine the world's progress.

CSEND, a think tank focusing on the development nexus of trade, poverty, employment and social equity, is contributing to these deliberation through its engagement in both the global, national and regional levels.

 

Implementation of post-2015 development agenda by Raymond Saner, 30 April 2014 at the Expert Group Meeting on the role of the high-level political forum on sustainable development in post-2015 development framework (30 April 2014-1 May 2014) in New York.

A special CSEND Dialogue session on "Socio-Economic Dimensions of Formalising Informal Economy: Impediments, needs and gender issues" on the 17 July 2014.
The majority of economic activities in the least developed countries are in the "informal sector". Workers and micro entrepreneurs alike in the informal economy are often trapped for a whole lifetime in conditions of precarious living and rarely get out of poverty. What could be the appropriate intervention strategies and the timing for such interventions so that the micro entrepreneurs really benefit from formalisation? What are the socio-economic and gender issues yet to be addressed?

A seminar on “Sustainable Development in the Developing World” was organized jointly by Centre for Socio-Eco-Nomic Development (CSEND), UNCTAD, Future of the UN Development System (FUNDS) and Business Systems Laboratory on 28th Jan. 2014. The debate took place alongside a book launch event and was focused on “whether the current approach to measuring sustainable development is good enough to support sustainable development in developing countries?”, part of the larger discourse on Post-2015 sustainable development goals.

CSEND organised a book vernissage in La Paz, Bolivia in June 2001. The book’s title is “Negociaciones en Cambio Climático y Ambiente:Dinámica global y local (Climate Change and Environmental Negotiations: Global and Local Dynamics)” and is edited by Raymond Saner, Sergio Jauregui, Lichia Yiu and published by Los Amigos del Libro, La Paz, 2001. The book consists 308 pages see below. here

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